how-to

Road to Berlin

Road to Berlin

Road to Berlin | Germany | 2017

Before heading back to the Pacific Northwest before sunrise on Monday morning, the significant other and myself took the road for our Nation’s Capital on Friday afternoon to visit close friends, do some shooting and shopping in the city  and attend a Whiskey tasting I got as present for my 50th birthday back in January. The photographs shown here are taken out of the moving car in a combination of slow shutter speeds (both were shot at 1/13 sec) and panning the camera backwards against the driving direction. The conversion to monochrome was done in Lightroom CC with the pre-set mimicking a TRI-X analogue film.

Wind Song

Wind Song | Germany | 2017

For more tips and inspirations published on the Streets of Nuremberg visit my free Learning Center.

Have a great weekend!

Marcus

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Instant Inspiration (20) – Backlit Fountain

Backlit Fountain Street Photography

1/125 sec @ f/5.6, ISO 200

“Instant Inspiration”  is my series for you if you feel you suffer from “Photographer’s Block”  or simply want to shoot something that you have never tried. Or at least not recently. Read the posts, become inspired, take your camera, head out and have fun! After a summer break I now bring you episode 20, where I work the scene around a fountain backlit by a late afternoon sun. For the how-to and the rest of the photos continue after the jump…. (more…)

High Key Wilderness

Etosha Animals HeyKey Panorama 03

Zebras in Etosha | Namibia | 2017

Somehow I have a hard time transitioning back to Street Photography, so here find another Africa post. While  sorting through my Namibia photos and selecting the ones I want to include in the photo book of our vacation, in a calendar etc…. I was also playing around with animal images I could convert to monochrome. I have a high key preset in Lightroom that I wanted to try out on panoramic groups of animals I photographed in Etosha National Park with my Olympus OM-D E-M1 with the mZuiko 40-150mm F/2.8 with the MC-14 Tele-Converter that increases focal length by factor of 1.4 . The Lightroom adjustments basically include increasing exposure and playing with the grad curves, were I increased the light midtowns and turned down the dark midtowns, to get that high key effect. I also increased the contrast and the clarity. To see more monochrome Etosha wilderness photos continue after the jump….

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Namibia Starry Night (and how I photographed it)

Starry Canyon Night

Starry Canyon Night | Namibia | 2017

The Namibian night sky is spectacular. Last night at Gondwana Canyon Village I had a first try at shooting the stars. I took this image right next to the cottage we were staying in.

Camera was the Olympus OM-D E-M1 with the mZuiko 12mm F/2 wide angle prime. I put the camera on a tripod, set the 12 second self timer (to avoid camera shake) and dialed in a 60 second exposure time at F/3.2 and ISO 400. I manually focused the lens to infinity. These are good starting points for some trial and error. For composition (as it was pitch dark in the direction I was looking) I lit the rocks with a torch while positioning the camera on the tripod, then turned off the light while taking the image. The lighting on the rocks came from the small walkway lights in my back of Gondwana Canyon Village, so I did not need to manually paint the foreground with my torch.

In lightroom I increased the white point to bring out the details in the milky way, opened the shadow up a tad, then adjusted the grad curves until I was happy with the results.

At next opportunity I will try a reduced shutter speed (like 1/30 sec) to make the stars more crisp while turning up the ISO a bit.

For other tips please visit my learning center.

Next up will  be a post about Fish River Canyon, so stay tuned!

Have a great weekend!

Marcus

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Recognition for the “Streets of Nuremberg”

Today I received a surprising e-mail. The “Streets of Nuremberg” have been selected by the panelists of Feedspot as one of the Top 75 Street Photography Blogs on the web. I made the list ranking 30th, which is all the more humbling as this list really features the “who’s who” of renowned Street Photography blogs, many of which I visit frequently.

Since I started the “Streets of Nuremberg” in January 2016, this blog has grown to 2.765 followers with an average of 160 views a day.

This would not have been possible without my readers, many of whom have become friends. And it is an obligation to continue bringing you my experiences and tips around Street- and Travel Photography.

Make sure you also frequently check out my  Learning Center with all my free tips, tutorials and inspirations around photography!

Have a great weekend!

Marcus

Weekly Photo Challenge: Elemental

Fire Seat

Fire Seat | 2017

Elemental” is the current theme of the weekly photo challenge (WPC) from Word Press’ “The Daily Post”. So I share four long exposure photographs representing the elements “fire”, “water”, “earth” and “air”. Anyone remembering the movie “Angels & Demons” ? First comes fire, where I experimented with long exposures to create the streaks. Image was taken with the Olympus PEN-F, specs are 1,6 sec @ f/2.8 ISO 80 (which is ISO Low on the Oly) and 30mm focal length. The rest of the elements you find after the jump…. (more…)

Weekly Photo Challenge: Focus

Travel Love

Travel Love | Budapest | 2017

Focus” is the theme of this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge from Word Press’ “The Daily Post”. I can meet the challenge with one of my street photos that I took just this past Tuesday evening in Budapest.

A photograph has to convey emotion, has to have heart and soul to capture the viewer’s imagination. It does not have to be technically perfect, it does not have to perfectly in focus. Sometimes, being a bit blurred can even add to the message of an image. When you look at the works of the masters of the genre, like Henri Cartier-Bresson or Elliott Erwitt, many of their iconic photographs are not technically perfect, but have an abundance of heart and soul.

This photo of kissing teenage travelers I took on Budapest’s famous Fischerbastei (Halászbástya) with the parliament building providing the background is for me such an example where the focal point of an image does not need to perfectly in focus.

I took the photo with my Olympus PEN-F with the mZuiko 14-150mm F/4.0-5.6 travel zoom, image specs are 1/10 sec at f/6.3 and ISO 1600, 63mm focal length.

Shooting with a relatively low shutter speed at 1/10 sec (due to the low evening light) my lens was not fast enough with the motions of the young couple. This is also a good example why leaving the camera in “P-Mode” makes so much sense. When you see a motive that attracts you just compose and press the shutter, without fumbling with the settings. Because capturing a possibly imperfect image that means something to you is better than no photo at all. It might not be perfectly in focus. But it can have heart and soul.

Have a great Friday!

Marcus

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Check out my Learning Center with free tips and inspirations around photography

 

Perfect Imperfection

Cuddly Protection

Cuddly Protection | 2017

This capture of an intimate moment between father and son is not a perfect photograph.

I took this photo late in the evening in a dimly lit street cafe. It was a difficult situation to focus in as there was just not enough light. Aiming and shooting quickly the auto focus did lock on the contrast rich edge of the toy tiger in front of the two main subjects of the photograph, resulting in their faces being thrown out of focus due to the long focal length and the wide open aperture of f/5.6 at the far end of my zoom range.

I took only this one shot, as a second later they changed their posture and that intimate  moment was lost.

Missing the focus makes this technically a failed image. Is it a failed image? I think it is not. A photograph needs to have heart and soul, needs to carry a story. It’s contents over form. A technically flawless photo isn’t any good if it’s missing heart and soul. If you study the work of the masters of Street Photography like Henri Cartier-Bresson or Elliot Erwitt, you find many of their great photography are technically imperfect images. But they carry a strong story.

So my advice is press the shutter when you see something that touches your heart and your emotions and worry about the settings later. Having perfect settings or a perfect focus doesn’t help you when the moment is lost.

The photo was taken with my OM-D E-M1 and the mZuiko 14-150mm F/4.0-5.6 travel zoom, image specs are 1/13 sec @ f/5,6 and ISO 1600, 120mm focal length.

Let me know your thoughts in the comment section.

Have a great Wednesday!

Marcus

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Evanescent

Dream Trees

Dream Trees | Brandenburg | 2017

“Evanescent” – soon passing out of sight; quickly fading or disappearing – this is the title of this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge from Word Press’ “The Daily Post”.

When I read this week’s theme in my WP reader I was just traveling by bus from Nuremberg to Berlin where I will spend the long weekend we have here in Germany due to our public holiday on Thursday.

Looking out the window I couldn’t imagine a more appropriate example of “evanescent”, as every single second the landscape in front of my window was disappearing behind the bus riding on the Autobahn.

For many more photos and a description of the technique I used continue after the jump… (more…)

Street Photography Quick Tip (10)

Old Town Reflections

Old Town Reflections | Nuremberg | 2017

Street Photography Quick Tip 10 – Using Photographic Obstacles

My Street Photography Quick Tips are short, easy to read and easy to use tips that I think could help you while shooting in the streets. Today’s post is about using photographic obstacles to your advantage.

Have you ever found a parked car blocking that perfect view in a city you visit? Well, you  can try to walk around, but sometimes that won’t help because the nice perspective disappears or there is another obstacle blocking your view.

Well, as simple solution can be: Use it to your advantage. Include it in the composition. It just might made an otherwise boring composition all that more interesting. In this case I included the front window and the roof of a parked car als reflection surface while taking this shot in Nuremberg’s historic Old Town below the Imperial Castle.

Try it yourself! Don’t be frustrated with this stupid obstacle, accept the challenge and have fun!

Find all my other Street Photography Quick Tips in my new free Learning Center.

Have a great Sunday!

Marcus

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