Camera History – Konica Autoreflex T2

Konica Autoreflex T2

The Konica Autoreflex T, launched in 1968, was the first camera with fully automatic exposure control through the lens (TTL). Both features, in their own right, already existed before: the fully automatic exposure control with built-in light meter on the Konica Auto-Reflex, the exposure metering through the lens on the Topcon RE Super / Super D and the Spotmatic series from Pentax. But the combination of both was new. Back then, fully automatic exposure control was a very advanced feature of SLR cameras, other manufacturers were still unable to offer this option a decade later, and until the end of the 1970s fully automatic exposure control was not a matter of course.

For more about this iconic camera and a visual journey around it continue after the jump…. Continue reading “Camera History – Konica Autoreflex T2”

Winter on the Streets of Nuremberg

nuremberg old town in winter 15
Castle Gate | 2sec – f/4 – ISO 250 – 20mm

We’ve got a lot of snow in the past days, although today the rain has washed away most of it. When it started to snow on Thursday, I decided to put camera bag and tripod in the car to head downtown for some after office shooting of the snow-covered old town. For more photographs and my weather induced challenges continue after the jump… Continue reading “Winter on the Streets of Nuremberg”

NYC Experience – Lady Liberty

Liberty Flag
Liberty Flag | New York City | 2018

The most iconic monument in New York City is doubtless Lady Liberty, the most famous statue of the world, guarding the entrance to New York harbor since 1886. For a bit more history about the Statue of Liberty, info about our visit and more photographs, continue after the jump…. Continue reading “NYC Experience – Lady Liberty”

#We Remember

#WeRemember
#WeRemember | Nuremberg | 2018

Nuremberg is the city where I was born, where I live and that gives this blog its name. It is also the city where in the 1930’s the infamous Nazi party rallies were held. In 1933, Hitler declared Nuremberg the “City of the Reichsparteitage (Reich Party Congresses)”.  The rally grounds and buildings, designed by Hitler’s architect Albert Speer, still exist, reminding us every day about the terror of the Nazi regime that culminated in the Holocaust and the horrors of World War II.

Both of my kids had the opportunity to meet Holocaust survivors in events organized by their schools, and everyone I met who had the chance to participate in panel discussions with survivors of Auschwitz, Dachau and other death camps, was deeply impressed by the stories those survivors could tell. But those who lived to tell about the horrors of the concentration camps more than seventy years ago, become less and less, and it will not be long until the last of those voices will remain silent forever.

In times where – in my country and in others – individuals, who deny or trivialize the Holocaust, can be elected to public office, we all have to stand together to combat anti-Semitism and all forms of hatred, genocide and xenophobia in this world. And when the last of the Holocaust survivors has passed, we need to remember and make sure this gruesome history does not repeat itself.

#WeRemember is a campaign reaching out to millions of people across the globe to photograph themselves holding a #WeRemember sign, and post the image to social media, to help spread the message as widely as possible. All participant images will be projected live at an event in Auschwitz-Birkenau on January 27th, the International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

I wish all of you a peaceful weekend!

Marcus

Spring on Nuremberg’s City Walls

Historic Nuremberg City Walls

Yes, we made it. We made it to spring. Finally. It was a gorgeous spring day in Nuremberg, temperatures finally above 20 degrees celsius, the birds are going crazy, buds are coming out everywhere, it is just beautiful! Balm for the soul, after a totally crazy work weak. These are some photos of Nuremberg’s northern historic city walls, around the Maxtor, constructed between the 11th and 13th century. Too see some more of the Imperial’s City fortifications on a splendid spring day, continue after the jump….

Continue reading “Spring on Nuremberg’s City Walls”

Welcome November

Night Fall
Night Fall | Nuremberg | 2016

November is upon us. Many persons I know dread this month, as it is the month of remembrance of the dead, the month of grey, foggy, cold dull days. There is lots of work in the garden to prepare it for winter. With the change of the clock to winter time this past weekend it is practically dark by 5pm. It is also the transition month between the last warm days of the year with the explosive colors of autumn and the happiness and joy of the upcoming festive season.

Even though daytime photography is practically limited to the weekend as daylight is limited to my working hours, November has great photo opportunities on its own. The fog that frequently enters the city and creeps along the banks of the Pegnitz river makes for great images when combined with the rays of the street lanterns and silhouettes of people rushing by. And its the best time to go out and do some night photography, something we now can comfortably do directly after work, without having to wait until 11pm like in the summer months.

Nuremberg provides for some awesome night photography opportunities, as you can see from the example above. I took this image from the Maxbrücke towards the Henkerhaus (hangman’s house) with its double arches crossing the Pegnitz River. Visible in the background are the twin bell towers of St. Lorenz Church.

I took this image with the Ricoh GR II. Specs are 1/4 sec at f/2.8 and ISO 1600. I rested the camera on the stone railing of the Maxbrücke and used the self timer to avoid shake. I always find it amazing what this small cam is capable of producing in terms of IQ.

Have a great November !

Marcus

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StoNur on the Road – Blood Mountains

Sorry for not posting the last couple of days, I still need to get used to the concept of blogging while travelling.

I’ve spend the last couple of days in the Dolomites Mountains of Northern Italy. A zone called the “Blood Mountains” after the fierce mountain warfare that took place between Austrian Imperial Troops (Kaiserjäger) and Italian mountaineers (Alpini) during World War  I between May 1915 and November 1918. To learn more about the history and our adventures in a mountain continue reading after the jump.. Continue reading “StoNur on the Road – Blood Mountains”

Nuremberg Explored (2)

Weißgerbergasse Nuremberg
Weißgerbergasse | Nuremberg | 2016

Weißgerbergasse

The Weißgerbegasse is a scenic alley in Nurembergs historic old town north of the Pegnitz River. Since medieval times home to the profession of the tanners (hence the name,  tanner or skinner =Gerber), the ensemble of 20 half timbered houses (Fachwerkhäuser) has survived the bombings of WW II, has been lovingly restored and is now part of Nuremberg’s Historic Mile (will do a separate future post about that).  Continue reading “Nuremberg Explored (2)”

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