Etosha

Namibia Explored – Etosha Wildlife

Out of my way

Highlight of any Namibia trip is a visit to Etosha National Park. Founded in already in 1907, the Park spans an area of 22,270 square kilometres (8,600 sq mi) and gets its name from the large Etosha salt pan which is almost entirely within the park.  The park is home to hundreds of species of mammals, birds and reptiles, including several endangered species such as the black rhinoceros. Besides the salt pan there are also areas of grass land, dry- and thorn-savannah. The wildlife is abundant, and especially in the dry season concentrated around the water hole. You can self drive through the park, mostly on gravel roads. There are several rest areas and camps distributed throughout the park where one is also allowed to leave the car.

Personally I find it super relaxing and almost meditative to slowly drive through the park, and just see what surprises nature has in store. Wildlife is not calculable, so some days you get really lucky, others there is not much to see. But the great thing is that anytime, around every corner, every thorn bush, the next amazing wildlife experience can wait for you.  To see what we encountered in Etosha National Park, continue after the jump…. (more…)

Namibia Explored – Elephants of Etosha

Meet the Team

Meet the Team | Etosha | 2017

One of the very highlights of our three-week journey through Namibia came at the very end, with the visit to Etosha National Park. Doing Safari in the African bush is always an exhilarating experience, seeing the wildlife up close and in their natural habitat. We’ve travelled to many national parks in Southern Africa over the years, and they all have their own beauty. What makes Etosha special is the abundance of elephants, appearing in big groups, which we never saw before. For some elephant impressions continue after the jump…. (more…)

Perfect Imperfection

Background Fight

Bush Fight | Etosha | 2017

As I already have written before, the master of Street Photography Henri Cartier-Bresson once stated that “sharpness is a bourgeois concept”. If you study his work (and that of other masters), he created many famous photographs that, while technically imperfect, strike the viewer with the heart and soul they carry.

When my Significant Other showed me this photo she took at a waterhole in Etosha National Park, I was immediately hooked on it. Yes, it is not pin sharp, and some critics might complain it lacks depth of field, but for me there is so much action and intensity in it that it supersedes any technical imperfection. This photo is so much Africa to me. So it deserves a prime spot on the blog. Kudos to the wife 😉

Yesterday the Streets of Nuremberg passed the mark of 3000 followers. For me it is still hard to believe how fast my little blog has grown since the first post I published just about 20 months ago to the day.

First of all I want to express my unlimited gratefulness to all of you who visit and read this blog. It is the joy of building the connections to so many great people across the globe through my blogging, the feedback I receive for writing about my passion for photography and my photographic endeavors – that is all the motivation I need to continue with the “Streets of Nuremberg”

Sure I ask myself what attracts people to this blog. Maybe it is a bit like this photo. Not technically perfect, but it carries heart and soul.

Have a great Wednesday!

Marcus

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Happy Birthday, Streets of Nuremberg

Drinking from my own mugs

S(treets)hirts of Nuremberg

High Key Wilderness

Etosha Animals HeyKey Panorama 03

Zebras in Etosha | Namibia | 2017

Somehow I have a hard time transitioning back to Street Photography, so here find another Africa post. While  sorting through my Namibia photos and selecting the ones I want to include in the photo book of our vacation, in a calendar etc…. I was also playing around with animal images I could convert to monochrome. I have a high key preset in Lightroom that I wanted to try out on panoramic groups of animals I photographed in Etosha National Park with my Olympus OM-D E-M1 with the mZuiko 40-150mm F/2.8 with the MC-14 Tele-Converter that increases focal length by factor of 1.4 . The Lightroom adjustments basically include increasing exposure and playing with the grad curves, were I increased the light midtowns and turned down the dark midtowns, to get that high key effect. I also increased the contrast and the clarity. To see more monochrome Etosha wilderness photos continue after the jump….

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