Tipps

Instant Inspiration (17) – Flower Photography with Zoom

Dreamy Poppies

1/200 sec @ f/5,6 ISO 320 and 135mm focal length

Sometimes I show you something on the “Streets of Nuremberg” that is outside the usual scope of my posts about street- and travel photography. During May natures just pops (pardon the pun ūüėČ ). Lush green and bright colors everywhere. But often the weather is still inconsistent, with many cloudy days. These conditions are actually perfect for some flower photography using a zoom lens. For more photos and some how-to continue after the jump… (more…)

Learning Center is online

Mobile learning

Mobile learning | Bangalore | 2013

Today my new Learning Center went online on the “Streets of Nuremberg”. This is how I want to call my one stop resource pool where you can find quick access to all my free tips, tutorials, inspirations and everything else that I want to give back to the community that gave me so much!

The Learning Center¬†is directly¬†accessible from the top menu of this blog, and here you find the links to all relevant posts listed under certain categories like “Street Photography Quick Tips” and “Instant Inspirations”, “Gear and settings” and some more.

The Learning Center will be constantly updated, so check back regularly! Have fun browsing!

I hope you like my latest attempt to enhance your experience with the “Streets of Nuremberg”.

Have a good week!

Marcus

Related Link:

Learning Center

Instant Inspiration (15) – Long Exposure Waterscapes

Columbia River

Columbia River | Oregon | 2017 | 8sec @ f/16 and ISO 200, ND3

Inspired by some photos I took during¬†last¬†weekend’s trips around beautiful Oregon I found it is time for another ‚ÄúInstant Inspirations‚ÄĚ post. This is¬†my series for you if you feel you suffer from ‚ÄúPhotographer‚Äôs Block‚ÄĚ ¬†or simply want to shoot something that you have never tried. Or at least not recently. With¬†Episode 15¬† I want to¬†inspire you to go out and shoot long exposure waterscapes.¬†For the how-to, more images and links to all previous editions of “Instant Inspirations” continue reading after the jump…. (more…)

Street Photography Quick Tip (8)

Happy Girl in front of fountain

Happiness | Munich | 2016

Street Photography Quick Tip 8¬†‚ÄstCapturing Gesture

Time for another of my Street Photography Quick Tips. One of those short, easy to read and easy to use tips that I think could help you while shooting in the streets. Today’s post is about capturing gesture. Don’t just capture people walking with arms hanging at their sides or with expressionless faces. Gestures can convey strong emotions in your photographs. If you want to find out more, continue reading after the jump…

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Instant Inspiration (6) – Storefront Windows

Streetdog

Streetdog | Nuremberg | 2016

It’s finally weekend again and time for another¬†episode of my “Instant Inspirations”. As we approach Christmas these December weekends are usually filled with power shopping. But why not take your camera along and try something creative while your significant other is inside a shop? Also, if you suffer from ¬†“Photographer’s Block” ¬†or simply want to shoot something that you have never tried or at least not recently, try using storefront windows as a free and ready available prop. ¬†For a bit of how-to, a few more exemplary¬†photos and links to episodes 1 through 5¬†of “Instant Inspirations” continue reading after the jump…..

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Instant Inspiration (2) – Motion Blur

Subway Ghost

Subway Ghost | Munich | 2016

After receiving so much positive feedback for the kickoff of my “Instant Inspiration”series (link to episode 1 at the end of this post) ¬†here is episode 2: Go out and shoot a motion blur image. These two photographs I took in the Munich subway with my Ricoh GR II. I used Shutter Priority¬†to set a low shutter speed of 1/6 sec (top image) and 1/8 second (image below), both were shot at f/11 with ISO 1600. What also works in these images are the complimentary dominating colors blue-green and red-yellow. The photo above¬†I shot out of the train window as it arrived at¬†a station.¬†¬†For the image below I stood at a platform shooting the arriving train with a waiting commuter in front. So next time you want to do something against your photographers block go out and shoot a motion blur photo using slow shutter speeds. You are invited to show your results by posting a link in the comment section. Go out and have a blast!

Arricing Train

Arriving Train | Munich | 2016

Enjoy your weekend!

Marcus

Related Posts:

Instant Inspiration (I) ‚Äď Get Down Low

Instant Inspiration (3) ‚Äď Silhouettes

Instant Inspiration (4) ‚Äď Juxtaposition

Street Photography Quick Tip (1)

Off Topic – Studio Anywhere

Portrait of Teenager Daniel

Daniel | Porto Ferraio | 2016

With today’s post I’m venturing far away from my usual posts around Street- and Travel Photography. But vacation time is not only time for intensified photography around documenting our family trip to Italy.

Holidays means also having finally time for a lot of (photography) related reading of books, blogs and websites to get fresh doses of inspiration. And also having time to try out a few things off your usual beaten paths.

In this case I decided to do some portrait photography with my (more or less willing) family. First victim up was my son Daniel. To see more and learn how this studio-like portrait was taken without help of any flash on a 1m stretch of white wall inside our rented apartment’s bedroom continue reading after the jump.

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Finding your photographic style

Drinks before the Show

Drinks before the Show | Hamburg | 2016

In today’s world photography has become mainstream. Excellent cameras have become very affordable and smartphones are 24/7 companions that allow everyone to do serious photography on the spot.

Each second thousands of photos are uploaded to social networks (Facebook, Instagram, Twitter) and image platforms (flickr, 500px). And all of us who contribute to this never-ending stream of photographic output hope that somehow our work finds some recognition.

With the growing numbers of aspiring photographers also the amount of educational and inspirational information has vastly increased. Photography magazines, how-to books, websites and blogs provide a wealth of technical knowledge and inspiration for just about every genre of photography that you can imagine. Thanks to this resources teaching yourself the technical and artistic aspects of photography (and even the business side if you want to look at that as well) is not difficult at all if you learn to differentiate the wheat from the chaff. I’m not saying that this replaces the need for a professional education (if you really want to work as a professional photographer you should have a proper one) but for all us aspiring wannabe professionals who dream about generating some cash out of our hobby one day the training material available online or what you can pick up by attending workshops is more than sufficient to get us properly started.

With affordable gear, a wealth of information and inspiration available remains the question what to shoot. I for myself feel attracted to all sorts of genres. Landscape, portrait work with available light or strobes, boudoir, street photography, macro, wildlife, fashion, travel, documentary, you name it. I have tried most of them to some degree or other. Even bought gear (ever heard of GAS ‚Äď gear acquisition syndrome) to being able to properly do it, inspired by one article or another in one of my many photography magazines, books or on a blog or photography portal site.

The thing is, all of this is nice, some come with caveats that are not easy to overcome (e.g. getting yourself models for portrait/fashion shootings, getting up in the middle of the night to catch the golden hours of landscape photography) so the genres that eventually attract you will narrow down themselves. And if you really want to become good at something you need to focus. Most great artists / scientists have been or are specialists of some sorts. Sure there are exceptions. Bryan Adams is a great Rock Star and also a well-known photographer, but in music he focuses on Rock and in his photography on portraits and fashion.

So how do you focus, how do you find the style of photography that suits your aspirations, that allows you to become good enough that you yourself are satisfied with the results. And again, as long as you don’t have to make a living out of your photography your own judgement of your results is the only relevant criteria. If in addition to that your work finds whatever recognition on social media, image sharing platforms, websites or photography magazines that is just icing on the cake.

The road to discovering your individual style as a photographer is a very personal one. But there are some things can help you and that have certainly helped me. Find out more after the jump. (more…)

Street Photography Below Street Level

Rush Up

Rush Up | Stockholm | 2016

Sometimes I turn Street Photography into Subway Photography. There are various good reasons for that. In the underground you can escape foul weather. On their way to and from the trains people are mostly in a rush so they tend to oversee the “hunting” Street Photographers. And in the subway cars travelers are often so focused on their smart phone or their books and papers that you have a very good chance to go unnoticed while taking candid portraits. For other good reasons to¬†take your Street Photography below¬†ground and more¬†subway photographs continue reading after the jump. (more…)

Little woes of a traveling photographer

Stortorget

Stortorget | Stockholm | 2016

You have been looking forward to this weekend¬†trip to a fancy city¬† that you always wanted to see. Time is limited, you only have a couple of days. You are travelling with your partner who is not all that much into¬†photography. ¬†You don’t want to spoil the¬†getaway by constantly logging behind, hunting for that perfect photo opportunity, that better angle, fumbling with your gear to change to the more appropriate lens.

And besides taking the marquee shots of well-known attractions (and that everybody back home expects from you)  you are looking for those special shots that you expect from yourself, because after all your are not after the tourist snap shots, for you are a photographer.

You arrive at your destination, it is great to be there, the sights and sounds are awesome, the food tastes great, you take the “must-have” shots, but photographically you just don’t get into the¬†right groove, into your creative flow.¬†And somehow¬†this frustrates you because¬†your own expectations¬†towards yourself are¬†otherwise and you know you won’t have¬†a chance to get back to this¬†city anytime soon when the photographic circumstances¬†might be¬†better.¬†Sounds familiar? Continue reading after the jump. (more…)