Portland Pearl District

Portland Pearl District
Old Warehouse in the Pearl District | Portland | 2017

As the job that pays the bills currently keeps me off the Streets of Nuremberg I can just as well make a virtue of necessity and show you a bit more of my “exile”, the Streets of Portland. And in case any Portlandians ever read this:  Rest assured, I honestly LOVE your city already, and the word “exile” isn’t really in place here. So in the coming months the Streets of Nuremberg, temporarily turned Streets of Portland, will introduce more and more of Rose City or PDX, as Portland is also affectionately known. Today I show you some photos I took on my weekend walk through the Pearl District, originally a quarter of old empty brick warehouses, now turned into an urban designer’s dream. To see and learn more continue reading after the jump…

 

Portland Pearl District
Modern Pearl District near Jamison Square | Portland | 2017

Until the turn of the millennium the Pearl District was a relatively unknown zone of Portland full of vacant lots and abandoned warehouses, mostly brick structures. In the 80’s and 90’s artists discovered the area, and not surprisingly, eventually the Pearl District turned into a hip area as the money followed the artists into this quarter as more and more old structures were converted into fancy living quarters. Starting 2001 the city council developed a Pearl District Development Plan and then thing really turned around for this area. Warehouses were turned into lofts and condos, fashionable restaurants, galleries and decor shop followed. Modern and sleek-looking buildings were constructed on the vacant lost, so today the Pearl District features a fascinating and visually appealing mix of old and new, of modern times and the historic past. The transformation has been remarkable and today the area is on the more expensive and upscale zones of Rose City.

A tour of the Pearl District would start at W Burnside Street heading north. Make sure you visit one of the many breweries (I recommend Deschutes or Fat Head), fancy shops like Oblation Paper & Press, see the Lovejoy Columns (remnants of the now demolished Broadway Bridge), visit some of the many galleries along the roads, look at the Ecotrust Building (where the conversion of the warehouses once started), take in the modern structures around Jamison Square Park, have a coffee at Barista while walking down the NW 13th Ave and see the impressive entry doors to Wieden & Kennedy ad agency (running the global Nike campaigns). You might want to finish the tour at Powell’s City of books, the world’s largest independent book store that spans an entire city block across multiple levels. I’ve never seen so many photography books in one place in my entire life.

Take a look at the following photos to get your own impression about Portland’s Pearl District.

Portland Pearl District
Deschute Brewery | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Oblation Papers & Press | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Lovejoy Columns | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Ecotrust Remnants | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Pensive Coffee Shop Guest | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Lovejoy Bakers | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Old and New | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Coffee Shop Window on 11th Ave | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Favorite Shop | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Wieden & Kennedy | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
13th Ave Strip | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Fat Head Brewery | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Reflective Corner | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Powell’s City of Books | Pearl District – Portland | 2017
Portland Pearl District
Mini Flat-Iron | Pearl District – Portland 2017
Portland Pearl District
North Park Elephant | Pearl District – Portland | 2017

On this little city walk I took the Olympus PEN-F with the mZuiko 12-40mm F/2.8 Pro Zoom and the Olympus OM-D E-M1 with the mZuiko 40-150mm F/2.8 Pro Zoom. Thanks to the relatively small m4/3 bodies and lenses carrying both cams in a small messenger bag isn’t an issue. The majority of the shots obviously were taken with the 12-40mm.  I hope you enjoyed these impressions of Portland’s Pearl District! Stay tuned for more…

Have a great day!

Marcus

Related Posts:

On the Streets of Portland again

Portland Monochrome Nocturnal Streets

Portland Pill Hill Evening Views

The Streets of Portland – Finally

Portland Sneak Preview

 

 

 

37 thoughts on “Portland Pearl District

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  1. I’m glad my city is treating you well! Portland has changed a lot since I was a child. When I first started going to Powell’s in the late 1970s, it was located in the grungy industrial district. If you have a chance, go to the newly expanded Portland Japanese Garden with beautiful architecture by Kengo Kuma. It opens to the public April 2.

  2. Very nice series Marcus. The puddle reflection maybe the nicest to my eye. The brewery shot is an excellent documentary shot. It gives a sense of the Pearl District.

  3. I’m gonna start looking for puddles 😃 what a magnificent shot!!! I am so inspired to try that kind of shot – wow! I loved our little tour too – always so fun to learn about new places!

  4. Nicely done Marcus! Try our Inner Southeast Industrial Area for what the Pearl started out as. Hurry, it’s changing already 🙂

  5. WOW!! Super Tuesday here Marcus!! I LOVE these photographs so much! I love that reflective corner, of course. Its my favorite I think but it’s hard to say because each is unique and really, really cool. Thanks for sharing! It’s beautiful here in Riverside. Bluer than blue. 🙂 You’ve given me some ideas because the bird thing is getting old. 😉 Have a great day!

  6. Love these! Especially the black-and-one one where the orchid is framing the person. It’s long been a dream of mine to visit Portland and Powell’s Books. Maybe some day.

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