StoNur on the Road – One Night in Budapest

Lions Gate

Lions Gate | 1/13 sec, f/4, ISO 800, 14mm

I just returned home from a marvelous long weekend that I spend with my significant other in Austria’s “Mühlviertel”. During the trip home today we passed through the Czech Republic, visiting Unesco’s World Heritage Site in Český Krumlov (pictures are coming up). Which brings the total of visited countries in the last 7 days to 5 (Germany, Egypt, Hungary, Austria, Czech Republic). And Tuesday I head back over the pond to Portland.

During last weeks business trip I actually had a free evening in Hungary’s capital Budapest, were I had the chance for 5 hours sightseeing (from 7pm to midnight). To see the photos and for a bit of history and information continue after the jump….

Nyugati Station

Nyugati Station | 1/100 sec, f/5.6, ISO 1600, 100mm

Staying in the Radisson Blue Beke Hotel on the Pest side of the city I took my Olympus PEN-F with the mZuiko 14-150mm F4.0-5.6 Travel Zoom and took the city tram (Line 4 or 6) towards the Buda side. First stop was the historic Nyugati Train Station. Opened in 1877, it features a spectacular iron roof construction. This is no surprise as the station was constructed by French company „Eiffel & Cie“ of Gustav Eiffel (father of Paris’ Eiffel Tower, who supervised the construction in person).

Margaret Bridge

Margaret Bridge | 1/1250 sec, f/11, ISO 200, 34mm

Hungarian Parliament

Parliament | 1/500 sec, F/10, ISO 200, 70mm

Next stop was the Margaret Bridge (one of nine bridges spanning the Danube in Budapest), there is a tram stop in the middle of the bridge, built 1872-76. From here you have a first spectacular view across the Danube River over to the Parliament Building.

Margaret Bridge

Margaret Bridge | 1/250 sec, f/5.6, ISO 250, 135mm

Green Worker

Green Worker | 1/250 sec, f/5.6, ISO 640, 150mm

Walking along the South bank on the Buda side I spotted this lady working in a modern office building, making for a great multi level street photo.

Hungarian Parliament

Hungarian Parliament | 1/320 sec, f/10, ISO 200, 29mm

Walking along the river I was treated to great views of the majestic Parliament Building. Visible to the right is the famous Chain Bridge and behind the citadel on the Gellert Hill.

Hungarian Parliament glowing orange at sunset

Hungarian Parliament | 1/200 sec, f/8, ISO 200, 22mm

The sunset I spend directly opposite the Parliament Building,  the seat of the National Assembly of Hungary. It is currently the largest building in Hungary and still the tallest building in Budapest. Construction was started in 1885 and the building was inaugurated on the 1000th anniversary of the country in 1896, and finally completed in 1904.  About 100,000 people were involved in construction, during which 40 million bricks, half a million precious stones and 40 kilograms  of gold were used. The building is in Gothic style and its symmetrical facade is 268 m (879 ft) long. 

St. Ann's Church

St. Ann’s Church | 1/80 sec, f/5.2, ISO 200, 36mm

From Batthyany Square with its baroque St. Ann’s Church I started the climb up Castle Hill towards the Fisherman’s Bastion, arriving on top with dusk. Castle District (Várnegyed) is famous for its medieval, baroque and 19th-century houses, churches and public buildings.

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman’s Bastion | 1,4 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200, 22mm

Fisherman’s Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style on the Castle hill just behind  Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Hungarian architect Frigyes Schulek. One of the principal attractions in Budapest it sports splendid views across the Danube with its bridges over to the Pest side of the city.

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman’s Bastion | 1/20 sec, f/2.2, ISO 200, iPhone

Danube in Budapest

Danube | 1/2 sec, f/5.4, ISO 200, 49mm

Illuminated Parliament

Parliament | 1/50 sec, f/5.4, ISO 1600, 58mm

St. Stephens Basilica

St. Stephens Basilica | 1,3 sec, f/13, ISO 200, 150mm

The church in the photo above is St. Stephens Basilica named in honour of Stephen, the first King of Hungary (975–1038), whose supposed right hand is housed in the reliquary. It was completed in 1905 after 54 years of construction.

Young Love

Young Love | 1/10 sec, f6.3, ISO 1600, 63mm

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman’s Bastion | 1/15 sec, f/4, ISO 1600, 14mm

The Look

The Look | 0,4 sec, f/13, ISO 200, 90mm

Creating Memories

Creating Memories | 1/25 sec, f/5.6, ISO 1600, 150mm

Street Portrait

Street Portrait | 1/13 sec, f/5.6, ISO 3200, 150mm

As main tourist hot spot the Fisherman’s Bastion attracts hundreds if tourists at all times of days, making it a Street Photographers heaven. Everyone is taking selfies or snapping the vistas of the city, so there isn’t a better sport to shoot some inconspicuous street portraits.

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman’s Bastion | 1/2 sec, f/4, ISO 200, 14mm

Parliament

Parliament | 1/20 sec, f/5.4, ISO 1600, 60mm

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman’s Bastion | 1/15 sec, f/4, ISO 1600, 14mm

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church.

Matthias Church

Matthias Church | 1/30 sec, f/4, ISO 1600, 14mm

Matthias Church was originally built in Romanesque style in 1015. The current building was constructed in  Gothic style in the second half of the 14th century and was extensively restored in the late 19th century. The church was the scene of several coronations of Hungarian kings.

Matthias Church

Matthias Church | 1/50 sec, f/5.4, ISO 1600, 56mm

Then I strolled on over the Castle Hill towards the Royal Palace. Following are some photos from the illuminated streets and alleys.

Castle District

Castle District | 1/13 sec, f/5.4, ISO 1600, 56mm

Castle District

Castle District | 1/10 sec, f/5, ISO 1600, 31mm

Mary Magdalene Tower

Mary Magdalene Tower | 1/15 sec, f/4.2, ISO 1600, 18mm

Final Stop is the Royal Palace, now site of the Hungarian National Gallery.

Royal Palace

Royal Palace, 1/15 sec, f/5.4, ISO 1600, 45mm

The Royal Palace (or Buda castle) was first constructed in 1265. It was significantly enlarged in the 15th century. The medieval palace was destroyed beyond repair in the great siege of 1686 when Buda was captured by allied Christian forces. In 1715 a small baroque palace was built but later burned down. The foundation of the current structure, a splendid, U-shaped baroque palace with a cour d’honneur was laid on 13 May 1749,the birthday of Queen Maria Theresia of the Austro-Hungarian empire.

From the terraces of the Danube side I had splendid views down to the famous Chain Bridge (constructed 1840-1849) and over to the Parliament Building.

Chain Bridge

Chain Bridge | 1 sec, f/5.6, ISO 200, 31mm

Budapest

Budapest | 1/6 sec, f/4.5, ISO 1600, 22mm

Royal Palace

Royal Palace | 1/2 sec, f/4, ISO 200, 14mm

The Palace was heavily damaged in the air bombardments of WWII and later reconstructed. Today it houses the National Gallery and a few smaller museums like the Coin Museum, the entrance to which sports a beautiful illuminated walkway.

Coin Lights

Coin Lights | 1/15 sec, f/4, ISO 1600, 14mm

Royal Palace

Royal Palace | 1/20 sec, f/4, ISO 800, 14mm

The back side of the Palace features the Court D’Honneur, the honor court yard, with the famous Lion Gate (initial photo in this post) as main entrance to the Palace.

Parliament

Parliament | 0,6 sec, f/6.3, ISO 200, 90mm

And with a final spectacular photo of the Parliament Building I finished the visit to Budapest’s Castle Hill District, taking Bus number 16 down to the tram station at the foot of the hill.

I hope you enjoyed this little sightseeing tour to Budapest and wish you a great week!

Marcus

Related Posts:

Portland Pill Hill Evening Views

Portland Monochrome Nocturnal Streets

StoNur on the Road – Color Splash

StoNur on the Road – Banana Streets

 

39 comments

  1. Beautiful captures! We visited in the late ’90s and we’re surprised at how cheap food was (compared to Germany and other European countries). Thanks for sparking wonderful memories!

    Liked by 1 person

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